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dc.contributor.advisorRay, Pallav
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tia
dc.date2016-04
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-28T20:45:18Z
dc.date.available2016-06-28T20:45:18Z
dc.identifier.citationHarris, T., (2016, April). Statistics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) amplitude. Poster presented at the Northrop Grumman Engineering & Science Student Design Showcase, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/931
dc.description.abstractThe MJO is the dominant intraseasonal (20-100 day) variability in the tropics. It propagates eastward at 5 m/s. An MJO event is separated into eight phases that correlates to the location of the MJO event. An MJO is measured by an amplitude per day. The amplitude is comprised of three components: outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at thetop of the atmosphere, 200 hPa zonal wind, and 850 hPa zonal wind. A relative index was created to categorized the amplitude from weak to strong. This index was used to break down the total days of data into the individual phases and showed that phase seven has the highest amount of days in the strong index. The three components that make up the amplitude were also broken down to find their relative contributions, which shows that theMJO amplitude is dominated by circulation anomalies and not convection. The spring and summer seasons were also compared by phases and the three contributing components.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStatistics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) amplitudeen_US
dc.typeposteren_US


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