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dc.contributor.authorAdegboyega, Nathaniel F.
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Virender K.
dc.contributor.authorSiskova, Karolina
dc.contributor.authorZboril, Radek
dc.contributor.authorSohn, Mary
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Brian J.
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Sarbajit
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-16T19:51:19Z
dc.date.available2015-11-16T19:51:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-13
dc.identifier.citationAdegboyega, N. F., Sharma, V. K., Siskova, K., Zbořil, R., Sohn, M., Schultz, B. J., & Banerjee, S. (2012). Interactions of aqueous Ag+ with fulvic acids: Mechanisms of silver nanoparticle formation and investigation of stability. Environmental Science & Technology, 47(2), 757-764.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/772
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the possible natural formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in Ag+ −fulvic acid (FA) solutions under various environmentally relevant conditions (temperature, pH, and UV light). Increase in temperature (24−90 °C) and pH (6.1−9.0) of Ag+ −Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) solutions accelerated the appearance of the characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of AgNPs. The rate of AgNP formation via reduction of Ag+ in the presence of different FAs (SRFA, Pahokee Peat fulvic acid, PPFA, Nordic lake fulvic acid, NLFA) and Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) followed the order NLFA > SRHA > PPFA > SRFA. This order was found to be related to the free radical content of the acids, which was consistent with the proposed mechanism. The same order of AgNP growth was seen upon UV light illumination of Ag+ −FA and Ag+ −HA mixtures in moderately hard reconstituted water (MHRW). Stability studies of AgNPs, formed from the interactions of Ag+ −SRFA, over a period of several months showed that these AgNPs were highly stable with SPR peak reductions of only ∼15%. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed bimodal particle size distributions of aged AgNPs. The stable AgNPs formed through the reduction of Ag+ by fulvic and humic acid fractions of natural organic matter in the environment may be transported over significant distances and might also influence the overall bioavailability and ecotoxicity of AgNPs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis ACS article is provided to You under the terms of this Standard ACS AuthorChoice/Editors’ Choice usage agreement between You and the American Chemical Society (“ACS”), a federally-chartered nonprofit located at 1155 16th Street NW, Washington DC 20036. Your access and use of this ACS article means that you have accepted and agreed to the Terms and Conditions of this Agreement. ACS and You are collectively referred to in this Agreement as “the Parties”).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/authorchoice_termsofuse.htmlen_US
dc.titleInteractions of aqueous Ag+ with fulvic acids: mechanisms of silver nanoparticle formation and investigation of stabilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es302305f


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