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dc.contributor.authorSalinas, Christine M.
dc.contributor.authorWebbe, Frank M.
dc.contributor.authorDevore, Trent T.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-02T14:03:27Z
dc.date.available2013-10-02T14:03:27Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationSalinas, C. M., Webbe, F. M., & Devore, T. T. (2009). The epidemiology of soccer heading in competitive youth players. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, (3), 15.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-9261
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/73
dc.description.abstractWe administered neurocognitive batteries to 49 youth soccer athletes (9–15 yr), who were selected from competitive soccer teams in Central Florida. We collected observational data on soccer heading, self-reported soccer heading, as well as demographics, including school, medical, and soccer history. Both the frequency and intensity of heading the ball in soccer was low in comparison with adolescents and adults. In our sample, the vast majority of soccer headings were of low to moderate intensity and direct (i.e., the incoming flight of the ball was perpendicular to the forehead). Age significantly correlated with frequent heading. Parents were reliable observers of their children’s soccer heading behavior and other at-risk behaviors during games. The majority of soccer headings were direct rather than flicks. Almost half of our participants reported headache and one-fourth reported dizziness after instances of heading the ball. Frequency of soccer heading was not related to neuropsychological score data.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis published article is available in accordance with the publisher's policy. It may be subject to U.S. copyright law.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://journals.humankinetics.com/submission-guidelines-for-IJSNEMen_US
dc.titleThe epidemiology of soccer heading in competitive youth playersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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