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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Kevin B.
dc.contributor.authorNickerson, Alexander K.
dc.date2015-04
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T18:37:35Z
dc.date.available2015-05-05T18:37:35Z
dc.identifier.citationNickerson, A. K. (2015, April). Drifting Anthropogenic Fibers in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida. Poster presented at the Northrop Grumman Engineering & Science Student Design Showcase, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/603
dc.description.abstractMicroplastics and anthropogenic particles serve as sources of pollution in the marine environment, and also as biofouling surfaces. The organic matter that accumulates on them can have an effect on the health of marine creatures. Alternatively, the particles themselves may be ingested and cause harm. Plankton tows were collected at five sites and examined for plastics, particles, and plankton. Densities of particles both relative to the water and to the plankton were computed and found to be high compared to the nearby Gulf Stream. The most common particle was determined to be a lignin related to cotton, a biodegradable substance that poses no obvious threat to the health Indian River Lagoon (IRL).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDrifting Anthropogenic Fibers in the Indian River Lagoon, Floridaen_US
dc.typeposteren_US


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