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dc.contributor.advisorWildman, Jessica L.
dc.contributor.authorCamilleri, Dinah Miriam
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-10T20:14:40Z
dc.date.available2019-10-10T20:14:40Z
dc.date.created2019-07
dc.date.issued2019-07
dc.date.submittedJuly 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2963
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2019.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough workplace discrimination based on group membership has been studied, there is little research focused on the experience of stigmatized individuals and the organizational outcomes of perceived stigmatization. This study aimed to determine whether perceived stigmatization leads to negative consequences such as emotional exhaustion, counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs), and reduced job satisfaction through the process of public/private self-schematization. A sample of 302 employees identifying as religious minorities were surveyed three times over a period of four months. Findings indicate that self-schematization mediated the relationship between perceived stigmatization and emotional exhaustion while partially mediating the relationships between perceived stigmatization, job satisfaction, and CWBs. Diversity climate weakened the relationship between perceived stigmatization and schematization, whereas religiosity strengthened the relationships between selfschematization, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction. Finally, need for authenticity also strengthened the relationships between self-schematization and emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and CWBs. This study contributes to organizational research and practice by identifying when self-schematization is most likely to occur, the associated negative outcomes, and diversity climate as a potential mitigating factor.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.titleConsequences of Public/Private Selves on the Stigmatized Individual in the Workplaceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2019-09-18T17:47:09Z
dc.embargo.terms2020-07-01
dc.embargo.lift2020-07-01
thesis.degree.nameDoctorate of Philosophy In Industrial and Organizational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial/Organizational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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