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dc.contributor.advisorWilder, David A.
dc.contributor.authorShuler, Ashley Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T17:44:36Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T17:44:36Z
dc.date.created2019-07
dc.date.issued2019-07
dc.date.submittedJuly 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2928
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2019.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe high-probability (high-p) sequence is frequently used to increase compliance. It involves presentation of a series of instructions with which a participant has historically complied immediately before the presentation of an instruction that has a lower probability of compliance (i.e., a low-p instruction). To date, the high-p sequence has received mixed support in the literature. Thus, researchers have begun to investigate alternatives to the sequence, one of which involves omission of the high-p instructions and noncontingent access to preferred items immediately before the delivery of the low-p instruction. In the current study, the effect of varying durations of noncontingent access to a preferred item prior to the delivery of a low-probability instruction was evaluated with three children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). A multielement design was used with three different durations: zero s, 30 s, and 3 min. The study ended on a choice phase. The results show a larger increase in compliance during the 3 min of noncontingent access to items for two participants and an increase in compliance during both the 30 s and 3 min for one participant. These results may suggest an alternative method for increasing compliance in children with ASD.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.subjectHigh-probability (high-p) sequenceen_US
dc.subjectComplianceen_US
dc.subjectNoncomplianceen_US
dc.subjectNoncontingent accessen_US
dc.subjectDurationen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Varying Durations of Noncontingent Access to a Preferred Item on Complianceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2019-08-23T15:44:53Z
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Behavior Analysis & Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.departmentBehavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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