Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHarvey, Ada
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Devon
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T15:13:28Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T15:13:28Z
dc.date.created2018-12
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.date.submittedDecember 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2765
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractSince DeLeon and Iwata (1996) published their seminal study on multiple stimulus preference assessments, the research surrounding preference assessments utilizing multiple stimuli has grown immensely. This has led to many variations of DeLeon and Iwata’s (1996) original preference assessment. Variations have included preference assessments conducted with videos, pictures, and activities. We compared the results of a standard tangible multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment (MSWO) to a verbal multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment with four individuals with developmental disabilities. A reinforcer assessment was conducted following each preference assessment to assess accuracy. Idiosyncratic results were found across participants. For two participants, the verbal MSWO predicted reinforcers more accurately than the tangible MSWO. For the remaining two participants, the tangible MSWO predicted highly preferred reinforcers more accurately than the verbal MSWO. The overall consistency of preference assessment was found to be strong and statistically significant through utilizing the Spearman rank-order correlation. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.subjectPreference assessmentsen_US
dc.subjectTangibleen_US
dc.subjectVerbalen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectAutismen_US
dc.titleA Comparison of Verbal and Standard Selection-Based Preferences Using the Multiple Stimulus Without Replacement Method for Children with Developmental Disabilitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2019-02-06T15:20:22Z
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Behavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Behavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.departmentBehavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record