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dc.contributor.advisorKirk, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.authorLevine, Darren Vaughn
dc.creatorLevine, Darren Vaughn
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T15:11:50Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T15:11:50Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/269
dc.description.abstractLiquid sloshing and propellant distribution is an important field of research for aerospace applications such as launch vehicles and spacecraft. The propellant mass behavior can greatly influence vehicle dynamics, altering trajectories and structural loading distributions. In order to combat these concerns some propellant tanks employ thin elastomeric diaphragms to separate the fuel from the gas volumes and restrict the fluid's motion. The diaphragm’s flexible behavior is generally highly nonlinear, and various propellant fill levels and acceleration conditions can cause large deflections resulting in complex buckling and folding patterns. When complex and non-uniform deformations occur, there is potential for diaphragm wear and damage to occur at contact and bending regions. Therefore the problem of simulating a diaphragm coupled with a fluid is essential to mass distribution prediction and damage prediction. This thesis explores and implements several fluid coupled diaphragm modeling techniques. Additionally, a comparison with experimentally obtained 3D scans of a diaphragm is made. The results from these analyses show that by using a soft body deformation model, membrane displacement behavior can be predicted with an average error of 7.1% with a standard deviation of 3.3%.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCC BY Creative Commons with Attributionen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en_US
dc.titleFlexible slosh diaphragm modeling and simulation in propellant tanksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2014-04-30T15:02:30Z
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Aerospace Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.levelmsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineengineeringen_US
thesis.degree.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technology
dc.type.materialtext


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CC BY Creative Commons with Attribution
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY Creative Commons with Attribution