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dc.contributor.advisorXinxuan, Che
dc.contributor.authorHoelzel, Kayla Lynne
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-17T17:51:33Z
dc.date.available2018-10-17T17:51:33Z
dc.date.created2018-07
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.date.submittedJuly 2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2611
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractPeople are different in their capacities in adapting and adjusting to dynamic workplaces. Previous literature lacks the distinction between the two constructs, which results in a lack of understanding in how adaptation and adjustment influence other organizational variables such as performance. In the current study, I first summarize the current literature on these two constructs from a few different fields in psychology, discuss the theoretical distinctions of these two constructs, and propose that they should be defined as separate constructs. Then, I establish construct validities for both concepts by developing nomological networks for both adaptation and adjustment based on the newly proposed framework and previous empirical evidence. Next, in three separate studies, an adaptation and adjustment scale were developed, pilot tested, and used for hypothesis testing, respectively. In the first study, the scale is created and evaluated for content validity. The second study pilot tests and evaluates the psychometric properties of the scale. The third study uses a healthcare provider sample to establish parts of the adaptation and adjustment nomological networks. Results provide evidence for two separate constructs.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.titleDistinguishing Adaptation and Adjustment: Effects on Communication and Safety Performance in Dynamic Work Environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2018-08-02T16:15:17Z
thesis.degree.nameMaster's of Science in Industrial/Organizational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial/Organizational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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