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dc.contributor.advisorElmore, Richard T. Jr
dc.contributor.authorMasi, Tracy A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-18T15:42:09Z
dc.date.available2018-05-18T15:42:09Z
dc.date.created2019-05
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.date.submittedMay 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2458
dc.descriptionThesis (Psy.D.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractThe emergence of World War I ushered in an era that utilized personality testing on a wide scale to meet the needs of the Armed Forces. The most common use of personality testing in the military has been to identify soldiers who are at most risk for functional failure when facing the unique stresses of warfare. More recently, personality testing has been integrated into training of U.S. Army candidates. Although historically women have contributed to the military, they were severely limited by law to the jobs they could hold. Those laws have slowly been dissolved. Females now have the freedom to choose combat positions and have more opportunities in the military. This current study aims to identify possible predictors of those females would not be successful through a U.S. Army Select Course, focusing primarily on the substantive scales of the revised Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, the MMPI-2-RF (Restructured Form; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011). Archival data exist for 182 female soldiers who were accepted into a U.S. Army Select Course. Data were analyzed to examine which scales would be associated with success in the course, and relative risk ratios were used to determine if MMPI-2-RF scales had predictive validity when selecting soldiers who were unable to successfully complete the training.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.titlePredicting Female Outcomes in a U.S. Army Select Courseen_US
dc.typeDoctoral Research Projecten_US
dc.date.updated2018-03-07T15:12:04Z
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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