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dc.contributor.authorLove, Brooke
dc.date2003/2004
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-25T19:47:24Z
dc.date.available2017-10-25T19:47:24Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationLove, Brooke.(2004).Development of an In-Situ Hydrothermal Dissolved Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Hydrothermal Environments.(Link Foundation Fellowship Final Reports: Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Program.) Retrieved from The Scholarship Repository of Florida Institute of Technology website: https://repository.lib.fit.edu/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/2128
dc.descriptionHydrothermal systems, oceanography, in situ sensorsen_US
dc.description.abstractHydrothermal systems at mid ocean ridges are a unique environment which connect the mantle, lithosphere, ocean, and biosphere in one complex system. Fluid chemistry is one key tool in understanding this environment, and carbon dioxide is the most abundant gas in these fluids. Its relative abundance and the information it can give about the magmatic activity, which is one of the ultimate drivers of these systems, and other processes, make it an attractive target for development of an in-situ sensor. This work has shown that attenuated total reflection (ATR) is a promising technique for in situ carbon dioxide measurements under hydrothermal conditions. This redesign of the hydrothermal carbon dioxide instrument has yielded a sensor that functions well in laboratory tests and has been calibrated between 0 and 250 mmol/L CO2. Mirrored surfaces and rounded faces on the ATR crystal were found to be problematic. An ATR element in the form of a truncated cone may be most appropriate in this aggressive environment and will be used in the next iteration. The high temperature, high pressure seal around the ATR element proved to be the most challenging part of the design, however a graphite seal was tested successfully and will be used in the next instrument. A coating of silicone was an effective method of water exclusion from the optical path length, even at high pressures. Finally, coupling of light into, and out of, the light pipes was far more critical than the output and sensitivity of the source and detector themselves. This work has brought us significantly closer to realizing real time, in situ measurements of sea floor hydrothermal carbon dioxide flux.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© 2016. the authoren_US
dc.rights.urihttps://repository.lib.fit.edu/handle/11141/1665en_US
dc.titleDevelopment of an In-Situ Hydrothermal Dissolved Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Hydrothermal Environmentsen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Oceanography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Washington


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