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dc.contributor.advisorGravina, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorSleiman, Andressa A
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-18T14:58:27Z
dc.date.available2017-08-18T14:58:27Z
dc.date.created2017-07
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.date.submittedJuly 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/1622
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present study was to evaluate an arrangement to establish feedback as more preferred when delivered after higher effort responding rather than lower effort responding. The study took place in the laboratory settings to simulate a working environment. Participants had to complete a mock medical data entry task, and after either one or 20 responses they received feedback. Participants in this study were 16 undergraduate students. The main dependent variable was the percentage of preference change in paired stimulus preference assessments for two categories of stimuli; shapes that signaled which condition they were in and managers that were delivered with positive feedback statements. Each participant was exposed to preference assessments and trainings. Trainings consisted of two conditions; high effort and low effort. Each condition consisted of three components; initial component (shape signaling condition), middle component (task; FR 1 or FR 20), and terminal component (managers). Results of this study indicated that preference for the manager for both high effort and low effort stimuli increased. In addition, preference for the shape stimuli for both high effort and low effort stimuli decreased. This paper discusses implications, limitations, and future directions.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.subjectFeedbacken_US
dc.subjectEfforten_US
dc.subjectPreferenceen_US
dc.subjectWith-trial-contrasten_US
dc.subjectOBMen_US
dc.titleFeedback and Effort: A Translational Studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2017-07-21T17:24:55Z
thesis.degree.nameMasters of Science In Applied Behavior Analysis & Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Behavior Analysis & Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.departmentBehavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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