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dc.contributor.advisorWilder, David
dc.contributor.authorErtel, Hallie Marie
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-31T19:02:16Z
dc.date.available2017-07-31T19:02:16Z
dc.date.created2017-07
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.date.submittedJuly 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/1608
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractNoncompliance is a common behavior problem exhibited by individuals who are typically developing as well as individuals with intellectual disabilities. The high probability sequence, an antecedent intervention, has proven to be effective to increase compliance to instructional demands. The high probability sequence involves presenting instructions with which an individual is likely to comply (high-p), followed by an instruction with which the individual is not likely to comply (low-p). Typically, three high-p instructions are presented before presenting the low-p instruction. The current study compared different ratios of high-p to low-p instructions (1:1, 3:1, and 5:1) to determine if there is a most effective ratio. In addition, participant preference for various ratios was also examined. Results showed that the 5:1 ratio was most effective at increasing compliance, and ratio preference was idiosyncratic across participants.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCopyright held by author.en_US
dc.subjectComplianceen_US
dc.subjectHigh-p instructionsen_US
dc.subjectLow-p instructionsen_US
dc.subjectNoncomplianceen_US
dc.subjectRatio sequenceen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Various Instruction Ratios During the Use of the High Probability Instructional Sequence to Increase Complianceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.updated2017-07-25T19:17:09Z
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Behavior Analysis & Organizational Behavior Managementen_US
thesis.degree.departmentBehavior Analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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