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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Kevin B.
dc.contributor.authorSweat, Lynn H
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T18:47:44Z
dc.date.available2017-01-05T18:47:44Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11141/1121
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) - Florida Institute of Technology, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractBiofilms dominated by bacteria and diatoms universally colonize submerged surfaces and mediate larval recruitment in benthic marine systems. The ability for macrofoulers to be transported by vessels and become globally established is likely affected by cues from the biofilm organisms they encounter. This study investigates how macrofoulers respond to biofilms shaped by local geography, transport processes and relocation. Biofilm assemblages in neighboring ports were largely unique to the site at which they were developed. Bacteria were primary drivers of variations among sites, and overall bacterial richness was an order of magnitude higher than has been reported for other marine environments. Diatoms drove differences between resident and transplanted biofilms and were found to survive shipping, including transport through freshwater. Different ship hull coatings and transport methods altered diatom assemblage composition. While biofilms were often unique with respect to bacteria and diatoms in this study, they affected the recruitment of < 30% of macrofoulers across the two experiments. Biofilms that were involved in recruitment and macrofouling community differences were usually from different ship hull coatings, suggesting that coating type was the underlying cause. This study proposes that macrofouling larvae are largely biofilm generalists. Such a resourceful recruitment strategy allows macrofoulers to colonize surfaces coated with a wide variety of microbial assemblages and is probably a key factor in their transport, establishment and global invasion success.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsCC BY-NC 4.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.subjectBiofilmsen_US
dc.subjectDiatomsen_US
dc.subjectBacteriaen_US
dc.subjectBiogeograhpyen_US
dc.subjectPortsen_US
dc.subjectMacrofouling recruitmenten_US
dc.subjectHull foulingen_US
dc.subjectShippingen_US
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_US
dc.titleExploring the Role of Biofilms in the Transport and Establishment of Invasive Marine Macrofoulersen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2016-12-07T21:24:34Z
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy in Oceanographyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOceanographyen_US
thesis.degree.departmentOcean Engineering and Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.type.materialtext


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